Simple & Cheap Bean Soup

posted in: extra | 1

Last year I created a soup quite by accident, but it turned out to be incredibly tasty and well-received. The plan was to have beans and cornbread ala Pioneer Woman. But my pinto beans, after cooking with two large beef bones all day, had created a very tasty broth, and there was a lot of it in the pot. The beans were already falling apart, there was too much liquid to boil down, and I wasn’t about to drain such liquid yumminess down the sink. So, it became Bean Soup.

This simple, cheap, and delicious bean soup recipe will help you when you feel your pantry is empty but you need a quick, nutritious dinner.

Super Simple & Cheap Bean Soup

  • Soak pinto beans (fill 1/4 of your pot with beans, then fill to the brim with water) overnight.
  • Next day, drain, and refill with fresh water and a tablespoon or so of salt. I prefer using the crockpot, but the stove works just as well.
  • Add in one or two meat bones (I used beef this time, but ham hocks are good, too; I had 2 large beef bones that were $1.50).
  • Bring to a boil, then simmer for at least 2 hours, but the longer the better. Or, cook on low all day on the crockpot or on high for half the day.
  • About half an hour or so before dinner, scoop out the bones onto a plate and pull of the meat, adding it back to the soup. Discard the bones and fat. Pour the broth back into the pan and add in a generous portion of beans.
  • With a potato masher or a few whirs of an immersion blender, mash some of the beans, but do not puree.

This tastes quite a bit like “Bean and Bacon” canned soup, but much better and without any strange ingredients or preservatives. It made a whole stockpot full for about $2, and it was enough for two dinners and a family lunch. It freezes well, too.

A perfect peasant meal for a rainy day.

This simple, cheap, and delicious bean soup recipe will help you when you feel your pantry is empty but you need a quick, nutritious dinner.

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  1. Annie
    | Reply

    I add about 5-8 peeled garlic cloves to the crockpot with the beans also. The garlic cloves mash down really well after cooking and give it such a great taste!

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