Iterate your plans.

posted in: homemaker, podcast 5

Organize Your Attitude #8

It’s paralyzed us all.

Perfectionism.

We wait to start moving forward with our plans because we aren’t sure if we’re doing it right. We aren’t sure they will work. We aren’t sure we like the colors we picked.

We pull back and reformat the page or change the app we’re using. We make the list over again to ensure we didn’t miss anything.


SO064: Resist Plan Perfectionism. Iterate.


We spend more time planning than doing the plan.

That’s perfectionism, and here is the solution:

Iterating.

To iterate means to perform repeatedly, to repeat a procedure, applying the result of the previous application to the next.

It’s technically a math term, but it applies beautifully to our busy lives at home which are so full of details and needs.

Start using your plan before it's perfect and the next plan you make will be better still. Iterate your plans.

Don’t wait until the plan is perfect.

Just start with what you have, where you are.

Reserve time every week and every interval for evaluation, but in the midst of the day, just move forward with what you know. The perfect plan is not going to be as helpful as the plan you have in front of you, put into practice.

The day-to-day is for execution mode.

Planning mode is easier, it is less risky and messy. It can be a form of retreat, of hiding from obligation and responsibility.

Dive in, each day, to the responsibilities in front of you.

A plan will help. A better plan will help more. But doing an imperfect or partial plan will be better than scrapping or adjusting your plan.

Reserve times to amend the plan.

Instead of being in constant planning mode, reserve times for it. Then, when you are supposed to be adjusting your plan, you have some actually data and feedback to work with.

You know where your sticking points were.

You have a better idea how your life intersects with your plan.

And the plan that you make after that reflection will be much better, more applicable, more individual, because you spent some time “trying out” an imperfect plan rather than waiting until you had everything ironed out.

Click here to learn strategies for overcoming your planning sticking points.


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5 Responses

  1. Kristin
    | Reply

    I think the word “iterate” will be my organization salvation. I don’t think of myself as a perfectionist but this post describes me exactly. You put words to a mindset that I have been stuck in for all of my adult life and didn’t know how to describe. I am going to dwell on these words and use them to help change my mindset: “but in the midst of the day, just move forward with what you know. The perfect plan is not going to be as helpful as the plan you have in front of you, put into practice. . . .But doing an imperfect or partial plan will be better than scrapping or adjusting your plan.”
    THANK YOU!

  2. Catie
    | Reply

    Mystie. You are a genius. I hope you know that!

    “Planning mode is easier, it is less risky and messy. It can be a form of retreat, of hiding from obligation and responsibility.” Ummm…yes. hangs head in shame

    I’ve been feeling like butter scraped over too much bread lately ;) and I find myself retreating into planning mode instead of doing the next thing. Of course, not having so many Things to do would be ideal! (I’m talking about outside activities–my schedule is too full right now!)

    I also really appreciated your post about cleaning the kitchen before bed! I could’ve written that! (but not as well. ;) )

    You are a blessing!

  3. Sarah d
    | Reply

    Seriously, this is genius. I am definitely a perfectionist and slowly realizing that now that I’m starting to homeschool “for real,” I can’t wait for that week long chunk of time to plan…it’s gotta be get something together and go with it! Thank you for your wisdom and insight!

  4. Ashley Weaver
    | Reply

    This is my exact problem. I love to use planning times as a means of escaping my reality. My ideal plans look much prettier than how my days and weeks actually pan out, right. But thank you for this! I need to get over being “perfect” and just “iterate.” Good words!

  5. […] Iterate Your Plans […]

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