Know your vocations.

posted in: homemaker, podcast | 4

Organize Your Attitude #6

If there’s one thing that derails our attitudes, it’s feeling overwhelmed and uncertain about what we should actually be doing.

There are so many options, so many opportunities. We simply must say no at times, but how can we know when we should say no and when we need to be stretched by saying yes?

The answer lies in our vocations.

Vocation literally means calling. It is much more than a job, although it includes your jobs. They are statements of the primary roles you play in life.

We each have ways of functioning that fit us, as persons. Our vocations are made up of the big responsibilities we’re given.


SO055: Clear Vocations


God has called us to particular good works, and He has not called us to do every good work. Taking time to clarify our vocations is an exercise that helps us discern those things God is calling us to so we can release the guilt of not doing the good works He’s called others to do.

For we are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them. –Ephesians 2:10

Vocation literally means calling. It is much more than a job, although it includes your jobs. They are statements of the primary roles you play in life.

To call our roles vocations is to remind ourselves that we do not determine our own mission or our own destiny. We don’t need a mission statement so much as we need to sit back and notice how God has gifted us and what God has given us.

Has He created you as a person and called you His child? That is a vocation.

Has He given you a husband and children? That is a vocation.

Has He given you roles in people’s lives or skills that serve the church or the community? That might be a vocation, or it might be a distraction or temptation.

What we are called to in one season of our life will not necessarily be what we are called to for our whole life.

It takes wisdom, prayer, and discussion with our husband and a good friend to determine what should be on our plates right now.

The first step in working that out and having categories and filters to run opportunities through is finding and naming your vocations.

I created a free guide to help you do just that. It is only the beginning of the discussion, but it is an essential beginning.

Find Your Vocations

A free guide for finding your calling and responsibilities so you can make decisions with clarity and peace.

4 Responses

  1. Paula
    | Reply

    “God has called us to particular good works, and He has not called us to do every good work.” I have to take issue with this statement. 2 Corinthians 9:8, Colossians 1:10, 1 Timothy 5:10, 2 Timothy 2:21, and Hebrews 13:21 all indicate otherwise. Each state that He prepares us for “every good work”. Titus 3:1 specifically says we are to be taught to be ready to every good work.

    • Mystie Winckler
      | Reply

      Being precise is good! Thank you for pointing out the phrasing. I do not think I am contradicting Scripture, but perhaps I was unclear. God has not called any one person in particular to do all the good works that exist in the world. We are each finite. We are also each given a role in the body (1 Corinthians 12). Raising children is a good work and God does not give each of His people that particular good work. We are to do every good work God calls us to: For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them. Ephesians 2:10

  2. Dorothy
    | Reply

    This is interesting. I have never thought of a job as a vocation. I always thought of vocations as either married life or religious life. :) After you find your calling or vocation, all the other things should work to enhance that one vocation. Not saying that’s correct, just explaining where I’m coming from. The idea of my job (I just started working outside the home after 30 yrs!) being a vocation is a new idea for me.
    I’ve always been drawn to volunteer work that would enhance my vocation but perhaps they were vocations too? If I had thought of my home businesses/volunteer work over the years (and job now) as a vocation, I think it would have been even more difficult for me to leave them when I needed to do so for my family or because my husband wanted to move once again. lol.
    I am excited to work through the guide and see what I discover, looking at vocation in a different light.

  3. […] Related reading: Know your vocations. […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *