2018-2019 School Year Plans: The Overview

In July (because of our year-round homeschool schedule) we will begin our 11th year of homeschooling. That is hard to believe until I look over and see two young men taller than I am at the table. For one of those tall young men, this will be his last year under my educational charge. Our plan is for him to do full-time dual enrollment at the community college (our state has a program for it that both my husband and … Read More

Homeschooling High School: Align Your Expectations

So we’ve successfully finished our first year of homeschooling high school. In many ways it was not different; we just took the next step. We didn’t drastically change anything about the workload or the process or the system. His level of work did increase, but it was simply another incremental increase in work of the same kind, not a completely different experience. I had planned to share 3 tips for homeschooling high school, but before I do that I thought … Read More

Classical Education’s Demands (Norms & Nobility Notes, ch. 1, III)

Although my book club just finished reading and discussing chapter 4 of Norms & Nobility, here on the blog I’m taking a slower, more ruminant approach so that I can sit with these ideas longer and so that you can follow along with me without pressure. Previous: Classical Education’s Delight, chapter 1, section 2 Next: chapter 1, section 4 planned for June 26th Our aim in education should be virtue – not only knowing what is good and true and … Read More

Why We No Longer Use Trello for Homeschool Checklists

I have many posts and YouTube tutorials explaining how we have used Trello to organize our kids’ homeschool checklists. Yes, that’s a past-tense verb because for the second half of the last school year we moved back to paper checklists, even for the high schooler. But if there’s one thing that a homeschool parent learns over the long haul, it’s that what works at one point, doesn’t necessarily continue to work. And the real test of a system comes when … Read More

Classical Education’s Delight (Norms & Nobility Notes, ch. 1, II)

Previous: Classical Education’s Distinctives, chapter 1, section I chapter 1, section III planned for June 5 Did you know that, historically, not only were the ideals of education and virtue intimately linked, but so was the ideal of happiness? When our founders wrote that we have a right to the pursuit of happiness, they were drawing on the classical tradition, which firmly believed that happiness was tied to virtue, not to consumer goods. Stating that the first true source for … Read More

Iterating on a school year – the results of my own homeschool audit

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This is our final week of homeschool lessons, then we’ll take half a week to complete our standardized testing and joyfully embark on our 7 week summer break, which will include a family wedding, swim lessons, and tennis camp. 3 things that worked this year Learning with friends. Sharing life and learning with likeminded friends is, by far, my favorite part of our homeschool year and a key in our consistency and much of our success. Other kids show up … Read More

Classical Education’s Distinctives (Norms & Nobility Notes, ch. 1, I)

Previous: prologue Chapter 1, section II planned for May 22 For years – decades, even – the classical renewal movement has been refining its definition of what classical education really means. Definitions are a vital place to begin, of course, which is why the conversation over definitions can be so frustrating. Shouldn’t this be an easy, simple question? Why is there so much dialog and development and even disagreement? David Hick’s very first chapter addresses both the definition and the … Read More

What to Read – advice on the liberal arts from Hugh St. Victor

Hugh of St. Victor was a Saxon churchman who read and wrote much. Wikipedia says of him: Hugh wrote many works from the 1120s until his death, including works of theology, commentaries, mysticism, philosophy and the arts, and a number of letters and sermons. Hugh was influenced by many people, but chiefly by Saint Augustine, especially in holding that the arts and philosophy can serve theology. _ In his primary work on philosophy and education (after all, philosophy – wisdom-love … Read More

Classical Education is Idealistic (Norms & Nobility Notes, prologue)

Slow read with me through Norms and Nobility. Or, if you don’t have or can’t get a copy of your own, consider this your Cliff’s Notes version. ? Previous post: Preface Next post: chapter 1, section 1 – planned for May 8 The prologue primarily addresses the dichotomy between the modern view of man and his role and the traditional, classical view. Or, as James K.A. Smith has written, “Every pedagogy assumes an anthropology.” What you believe about man shapes … Read More

What do I do when my kid complains?

It will happen. “I hate this book!”

 “Do we have to do Morning Time?” “There’s no point in learning algebra!” When it happens, you have not failed. Pick up your shield of imperviousness, homeschool mama; these complaints are not about you. They are not even about what you are studying. They are growing pains. Learning is growing, and when it’s happening, there are times it is uncomfortable, difficult, or tense. Of course, that doesn’t make it ok. Truth: Complaining, grumbling, … Read More

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