Classical Education: Definitions | Norms & Nobility Notes, preface

I am currently in an online book club studying Norms and Nobility by David Hicks, a classical education cornerstone. By the time I was halfway through chapter 1, I knew I’d have to blog through my readings. As I continued to make my commonplace notes and copy quotes, I also realized I was going to have to blog slowly, because I don’t want treatise-length posts, and I also don’t want to skip any of the ideas. So, if you want … Read More

The Importance of Monday Meetings

posted in: homeschooler | 3

Monday meetings have been a staple in our homeschool routine for a couple years now. We started when my oldest began seventh grade. At that point, I wanted him to have more independence in his work – not in choosing what, but in choosing when. Sometimes Monday meetings has been when I’ve gone over all the previous week’s work (except for math, which is corrected daily) before assigning the next week. Sometimes Monday meetings will be a calendar-review time, because … Read More

Accountability through camaraderie & care

If I pop into my husband’s office around 9 in the morning, I do so with as much stealth as I can, blending into the background as I grab my laptop or a book or more lined paper. It’s stand up time, and there he is, standing, listening to his coworkers on video chat explain what they’ve done since yesterday’s stand up and what they will be working on next. It doesn’t take much time, but it keeps the team … Read More

Twelve-year-olds are persons, too.

posted in: homeschooler, mother, podcast | 6

Charlotte Mason’s First Principle, applied I am in a local book club, studying Charlotte Mason’s 20 Principles using the study guide by Brandy Vencel. I’ve done this study in an online group before, but there’s something different and more personal in a local group that includes people who know your kids and family. Last month’s meeting was on Principle 1: Children are born persons, and one of the extra readings linked to in the study guide is a post I … Read More

What Is Character? and How to Build It.

Character is one of those words we toss around often. Too often, we do so without a clear understanding of what it is. We say we care about character, perhaps even homeschool for the purpose of shaping our children’s character, but what exactly does that mean and how exactly do we go about such a task? #093: Character builders for mom & kids The dictionary defines character as: Suddenly, we are taken aback. 
Wait? 

Mental qualities are a part of … Read More

Speaking well is part of living well. – Charlemagne on education

_ If the goal of education is virtue, why bother studying science or spelling or rhetoric? Why not just hunker down and do character lessons and call it a day? Our idea of virtue is too shallow. We see our moral sense unconnected to our knowledge or even to our ability to communicate. But they are not unconnected. They should all – and do all – feed each other when submitted to God. The selection I’m highlighting today from The … Read More

When your kid says, “I hate math!”

posted in: homeschooler | 3

If you’ve homeschooled for any length of time, you’ve probably encountered them: math fits. On good days, it looks like mad math doodles and rhyming complaints. On average days, it looks like snarky word-answers to word-problems and bitter mutterings about John or Sue finding out how much they spent for themselves instead of asking someone else to do their work for them. Sure, we have good math days, too. Sometimes we even encounter a new topic, it clicks, and we … Read More

How to Focus on Truth in a Homeschool Day

posted in: homeschooler, mindset, mother | 0

It’s easy for a homeschool day to go off the rails. As must as we would like to blame the toddler or the teen, usually that derailing starts in our own heads, in our own hearts, as the homeschool mom. Our mood, our demeanor, our responses, make or break the atmosphere of our homeschool. And so our thoughts and our emotions matter. Do we control them or do they control us? When our moods and minds are being swayed by … Read More

What to teach and how and why. – Alcuin on schools

_ Once again we delve into the history of classical education as I slowly read through The Great Tradition: Classic Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being. We now move from the early church into the early medieval period, erroneously called The Dark Ages. Alcuin of York was a pupil of a great and learned bishop and inherited the schoolmaster position from his master. Alcuin led a revival of learning in England and Europe, earning the … Read More

Is virtue an action or an attitude? – Gregory the Great on the contemplative life

posted in: classical education | 0

_ Gregory the Great, of gregorian chant fame, was pope in the 6th century. Born of noble family and classically educated, Gregory opened monasteries, sent a bishop-led mission to newly discovered England, and is one of the four recognized “doctors of the Latin church.” The selection included in The Great Tradition is not about education per se, not about educating the young, at least. Rather, it is about the right kind of life to pursue. It is a pure life … Read More

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