Choose a growth mindset.

posted in: mindset, mother 3

How to organize your attitude #1 An organized attitude is a growth-oriented attitude. An attitude that perceives life from the lens of growth rather than mere failure or success makes us resilient, open, grateful. When we see the circumstances God sends our way as opportunities to grow, then we do not have to fear, we do not have to get angry, we do not have to panic. Instead, we hunker down and see that we are being given the opportunity … Read More

The Blessing of a Public Tantrum

posted in: mindset, mother 10

We’ve seen them. The child screaming, red-faced at the park, oblivious to parental admonitions. The toddler rocking in the cart, yelling because he didn’t get his way. We sigh and shake our heads as we move along our way. Until it’s us and our children. My toddlers rarely threw real tantrums, but when they have, it’s been at the grocery store. Sure, at the grocery store or in the middle of a crowded park, when we have guests or when … Read More

Being Happy: Having an organized attitude

posted in: mindset, mother 12

An organized attitude, scholé, and ordo amoris are all tightly connected, at least in my mind. The threads are coming together in the book Reordered Love, Reordered Lives: Learning the Deep Meaning of Happiness which I purchased and began chiefly on the strength of the title. Of course I checked out the author and a few reviews, but the title had me. I’ve not been disappointed. Virtue is Happiness Virtue is my word of the year for 2015, and it … Read More

Daily faithfulness over measurable results

posted in: homemaker, mindset, mother 5

One more post about Michael Horton’s Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World if you’ll humor me. I think this is a book any mom deep in the trenches of raising kids would appreciate. Horton grounds us in solid teaching that centers us on the Gospel, in the finished work of Christ, rather than on ambitious, restless desires for “doing great things for God.” This doesn’t mean we do nothing. Rest is not inactivity. Is is a state of … Read More

You are in charge of your choices.

I recently finished Sally Clarkson’s new book, Own Your Life. The Clarksons are authors of one of my favorite homeschooling books, especially for starting out with young kids: Educating the Whole-Hearted Child. Owning your life is hard work and there are no easy answers. Sally Clarkson writes about how to be in charge of your life – not in a way that is controlling and self-seeking or self-aggrandizing, but in a way that sees that choices have consequences. We are … Read More

How to beat survival mode.

posted in: mindset, mother 3

I probably wouldn’t have even written anything about Crystal Paine’s Say Goodbye to Survival Mode: 9 Simple Strategies to Stress Less, Sleep More, and Restore Your Passion for Life, except that several of you said you wanted to hear what I thought when I was done. There weren’t too many quotables to pull out, and I’d rather post about The Secret Providences of God or The Liberal Arts Tradition. But this is the one I finished this week, and you … Read More

The Quality of Contentment

posted in: mindset, mother 5

I’m almost finished reading The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment – though I did count it in my 2014 total and included in my top five favorite books. Burroughs, a seventeenth century Puritan, develops multiple avenues for developing contentment. After expounding on his specific and deep definition of what contentment is, he then moves on to develop ways we can grow in contentment during our lifetimes – because growing in contentment is part of growing in maturity and grace in … Read More

Morning Time As Lectio Divina

If classical education is the art of becoming free, then we need to build our habits of attention. The British-born turn-of-the-century American journalist, Sydney Harris, once posited: For this to be accomplished, we have to be selective and meditative about how and with what we furnish our minds – yes, our minds, and not only our children’s. Circle Time, or Morning Time (or Basket Time or Morning Meeting or whatever your family calls it), is our time for centering on … Read More

Choosing Conviviality or Perpetuating a Pity Party?

Is happiness an emotion reserved for those who have an easy life? Right now I have a child who thinks happiness is a life without math fact drill pages. And, he’s onto something that misery is dragging one’s feet and taking three hours to do what should take one three minutes. However, cause and effect might be different than his perception. The secret of happiness is not in doing what one likes, but liking what one has to do. — … Read More

What is Intrinsic Motivation? Motivating Without Stickers

So, if Daniel Pink, in his book Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, is correct in his conclusions, extrinsic motivators should be taboo whenever the work we assign requires creativity or when it is something that touches personhood (virtue, learning). So what tactics are left to us? If we aren’t to use sticker charts or play money or marbles or other superficial reward structures, are there any tactics we can use? Intrinsic Motivators in the Home & Homeschool … Read More

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