Living from a state of rest

Cum dignitate otium, or Rest The Education is for Life Series This principle was another where I had to do my own searching for an applicable Latin motto. I could not leave out the concept of Leisure, the Basis of Culture, or Rest, or scholé. However, I had to laugh at myself, I started with a Google search of “Schole Latin motto.” Scholé, is, of course, Greek, and so nothing helpful came up. So, I discovered that otium was the … Read More

Daily Faithfulness

posted in: mother, podcast | 2

Festina Lente, or Faithfulness part of the Education Is for Life series This series was inspired by Chrisopher Perrin’s great webinars on the principles of classical education. One of my favorites so far was his “deep dive” into the principle Festina Lente. Erasmus wrote of this proverb in his Adagia: If you weigh carefully the force and the sentiment of our proverb, its succinct brevity, how fertile it is, how serious, how beneficial, how applicable to every activity of life, … Read More

Seeking or Seeming?

Esse quam videri, or Virtue The Education is for Life series In Christopher Perrin’s lecture, “Eight Essential Principles of Classical Education,” he talks about educational virtues, but for these musings of mine, I want to expand it beyond education and to our lives generally and broadly. While outlining this series, I wanted each of my principles to have a Latin motto, for consistency and parallelism and fun. Perrin didn’t have a Latin phrase attached to his “virtues” point, but Then, … Read More

The Simple Life.

posted in: homeschooler, mother, podcast | 2

Multum non Multa, or Simplicity Part of the Education Is for Life Series It is true that education is a life, and it is true that Life is an education, but it is also true that education is for life. If this classical education we are seeking for our children is meant to prepare them for life – and it is – then is it not true that we ourselves – as mothers, as women – need this preparation? While … Read More

Simply Contemplate: Crazy Busy by Kevin DeYoung – Simply Convivial

posted in: podcast | 4

Ok, so I’m on a Kevin DeYoung kick. Crazy Busy: A Mercifully Short Book on a Really Big Problem is another short 5-star offering from the Reformed Michigan pastor. The Terror of Total Obligation: Calming the Crazy Man Inside That is the chapter title and subheading from which I am about to quote. We all have a cross to carry. But it’s a cross that kills our sins, smashes our idols, and teaches us the folly of self-reliance. It’s a … Read More

31 Days of Organizing Homeschool Stuff: Schedule & Chore Board – Simply Convivial

posted in: extra, podcast | 7

This month I am taking you on a tour of my favorite organizing solutions. They aren’t likely to be hot on Pinterest or featured on a crafty blog, but they make life around here run more smoothly. Our New & Improved Chore Board (with Cloak of Invisibility) I’ve created a few iterations of a chore board over the last year and a half. First it was a poster board frame, and I wrote directly on the hard plastic frame. That … Read More

Classically Charlotte: The nature of children

posted in: classical education, podcast | 1

Previously, in this series: Charlotte Mason, classical educator Principle #1: Children are born persons Charlotte Mason’s second principle of education is perhaps stated poorly. Because of this statement, many (myself, for a time, included) write her off as a Victorian sentimental heretic. Her second principle states Children are not born either good or bad, but with possibilities for good and for evil. However, she is speaking here – as her development of the principle makes clear if she is given … Read More

Classically Charlotte: Children are born persons

posted in: classical education, podcast | 1

So Brandy of Afterthoughts is leading a study of Charlotte Mason’s 20 Principles of Education at the Ambleside Online forum, and even though I don’t use Ambleside, I very much respect and admire Miss Mason’s principles. So, I thought I’d follow their discussion and also work out here how her principles align with classical categories. Principle of Education #1: Children are born persons. Children are born as image-bearers of God, yet also subject to sin. They are not blank slates. … Read More

Miss Charlotte Mason, classical educator

This post was first published in 2013; find more, related articles at the end of this post. Given the definition of classical education we developed previously – that classical education is a set of principles that focuses on developing a love of truth, goodness, and beauty – I then give you this, from Charlotte Mason’s Philosophy of Education: One sentence, and that’s the real crux of it. What is the point of our studies? It is not to get into … Read More

What does classical education mean?

A label is a tricky thing. Just when you decide to take on an adjective as an identity, you find people including shades of meaning that you don’t personally want to own. For this reason, it’s common now to eschew labels altogether and call them useless and misleading. However, I think we should be comfortable generalizing and allowing ourselves to be generalized. One generalized label is classical eduction. Under that umbrella, you can find many different – sometimes seeming contradictory … Read More

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