What to Read – advice on the liberal arts from Hugh St. Victor

Hugh of St. Victor was a Saxon churchman who read and wrote much. Wikipedia says of him: Hugh wrote many works from the 1120s until his death, including works of theology, commentaries, mysticism, philosophy and the arts, and a number of letters and sermons. Hugh was influenced by many people, but chiefly by Saint Augustine, especially in holding that the arts and philosophy can serve theology. _ In his primary work on philosophy and education (after all, philosophy – wisdom-love … Read More

Studies for the sake of the church – Rhabanus Maurus on the liberal arts

No, I didn’t know who he was either, before reading this next selection from The Great Tradition: Classical Writings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being. Rhabanus Maurus was a Germanic monk who studied under Alcuin at Tours. In fact, the name Maurus is an honorific given him by Alcuin. He was deeply learned; read Scripture, the Church Fathers, as well as Greek & Roman literature; he wrote commentaries as well as textbooks on the liberal arts. … Read More

Wisdom leading to virtue is the only liberal art – Seneca on learning

posted in: classical education, podcast | 3

I am making slow, slow progress through The Great Tradition: Classical Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being is a collection of the writings about education from Plato to the modern era, the writings that have informed the development of western civilization and classical education. CH072: Teaching is Hard & Worth It: Seneca on Education Today is one final quote from Seneca, Roman statesman living in the time of Christ and Nero, whom the medievals and … Read More

An education based on harmony

If you’re reading Afterthoughts (and I’m assuming you are, of course), then you might start getting the feeling that you really should read The Liberal Arts Tradition, and you’d be right. Where Karen Glass’ Consider This nudged Charlotte Mason devotees toward the classical tradition, The Liberal Arts Tradition nudges classical educators toward the Charlotte Mason – because these are actually channels within the same stream, not different streams. Charlotte Mason took the classical education principles she learned — by her … Read More

What are the liberal arts?

I am almost done reading The Liberal Arts Tradition, but I know I have at least two more posts in me for this one. I feel like I understand the liberal arts aspect of classical education so much better now, and that foundational understanding makes it easier to make choices come spring curriculum-planning time. I so much appreciate how the authors draw out classical education as a stream with each section. They cover each liberal art (and everything else they … Read More

Living a Liberal Life of Contemplation | Leisure, the Basis of Culture, chapter 2

Was some of this chapter still German? Are you sure this is in English? I was totally lost and had really no idea what half this chapter was talking about. I picked up this book last year and started, and after chapter 2 never picked it up again until now. And now I remember why. I’ll keep going now that I have group motivation, but only if he becomes more intelligible to me. It’s no fun slogging through a book … Read More

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