Classical Education’s Dialogue (Norms & Nobility Notes, ch. 1 IV)

The slow series through Norms and Nobility, section by section. Previous: Classical Education’s Demands, chapter 1, section 3 Next: chapter 2, section 1 planned for July 23 Section 4 of chapter 1 explains that within the classical tradition, there have always been two different types of teachers, two different approaches. Hicks calls them the rhetorician and the philosopher. Both schools agreed that virtue must be taught, that teaching virtue was the aim of education. It was in how to do … Read More

Classical Education’s Demands (Norms & Nobility Notes, ch. 1, III)

Although my book club just finished reading and discussing chapter 4 of Norms & Nobility, here on the blog I’m taking a slower, more ruminant approach so that I can sit with these ideas longer and so that you can follow along with me without pressure. Previous: Classical Education’s Delight, chapter 1, section 2 Next: chapter 1, section 4 planned for June 26th Our aim in education should be virtue – not only knowing what is good and true and … Read More

Classical Education’s Delight (Norms & Nobility Notes, ch. 1, II)

Previous: Classical Education’s Distinctives, chapter 1, section I chapter 1, section III planned for June 5 Did you know that, historically, not only were the ideals of education and virtue intimately linked, but so was the ideal of happiness? When our founders wrote that we have a right to the pursuit of happiness, they were drawing on the classical tradition, which firmly believed that happiness was tied to virtue, not to consumer goods. Stating that the first true source for … Read More

Classical Education’s Distinctives (Norms & Nobility Notes, ch. 1, I)

Previous: prologue Next: Chapter 1, section II For years – decades, even – the classical renewal movement has been refining its definition of what classical education really means. Definitions are a vital place to begin, of course, which is why the conversation over definitions can be so frustrating. Shouldn’t this be an easy, simple question? Why is there so much dialog and development and even disagreement? David Hick’s very first chapter addresses both the definition and the dialog surrounding classical … Read More

Classical Education is Idealistic (Norms & Nobility Notes, prologue)

Slow read with me through Norms and Nobility. Or, if you don’t have or can’t get a copy of your own, consider this your Cliff’s Notes version. ? Previous post: Preface Next post: chapter 1, section 1 The prologue primarily addresses the dichotomy between the modern view of man and his role and the traditional, classical view. Or, as James K.A. Smith has written, “Every pedagogy assumes an anthropology.” What you believe about man shapes how you educate. Classical education … Read More

Classical Education: Definitions | Norms & Nobility Notes, preface

I am currently in an online book club studying Norms and Nobility by David Hicks, a classical education cornerstone. By the time I was halfway through chapter 1, I knew I’d have to blog through my readings. As I continued to make my commonplace notes and copy quotes, I also realized I was going to have to blog slowly, because I don’t want treatise-length posts, and I also don’t want to skip any of the ideas. So, if you want … Read More