What makes a good teacher? – Plato on learning & teaching

I’m reading The Great Tradition this year, and posting about it as I go. I’ve had a few people ask about a schedule, but I’m not committing to anything but slow progress. I’m taking a page from Brandy on slow reading and sitting down most days to read two or three pages at a time. Today’s commonplace quote is from page 4. I told you I am reading it slowly! This selection is from Plato, the first philosopher on education … Read More

What a Novel Taught Me about Housework

posted in: homemaker, podcast 22

Years ago, when my third born was just a baby, I hated housework. I was torn between wanting to be a good, competent homemaker and thinking that the state of my bedroom or the kitchen wasn’t a big deal. I could get meals on the table, keep things stocked, and complete a project just fine. But the day-in day-out routine tasks were a drag. I’m not going to say that I love those routines now or that I totally rock … Read More

An education based on harmony

If you’re reading Afterthoughts (and I’m assuming you are, of course), then you might start getting the feeling that you really should read The Liberal Arts Tradition, and you’d be right. Where Karen Glass’ Consider This nudged Charlotte Mason devotees toward the classical tradition, The Liberal Arts Tradition nudges classical educators toward the Charlotte Mason – because these are actually channels within the same stream, not different streams. Charlotte Mason took the classical education principles she learned — by her … Read More

Seeking Leisure & Scholé

I am currently in the midst of the summer teacher class “Bringing Scholé to the Home & Homeschool,” taught by Dr. Christopher Perrin. He’s been assigning chapters from The Liberal Arts Tradition and Leisure, the Basis of Culture, and though I’ve read both books before, it’s been excellent to revisit Leisure (it’s been years since I last read it) with the opportunity to discuss it with others and to see how The Liberal Arts Tradition is putting legs on the … Read More

Teaching Kids to Keep a Commonplace

posted in: homeschooler 6

If you missed it, check out my review of Kathy’s wonderful language arts materials and Book of Centuries. This is a guest post by Kathy Weitz. The Schole Sisters have done a fabulous job of telling y’all what a commonplace book is and why you should do it. I have also written about my own personal journey with commonplacing. Commonplace books are a fixture in our homeschool and in our local classical liberal arts co-op, Providence Prep, where I teach … Read More

Why Are Classical Education Principles Important?

I like to talk about education philosophy and principles much more than methods, though I do have a soft spot for practical tips. However, unless we are grounded in our principles, we will be tossed to and fro by all the practical tips out there. Every practical tip is born from underlying principles, and if the philosophy behind the practical tip you’re trying doesn’t match your own philosophy (because you have one, whether you’ve thought it through and acknowledged it … Read More

How is scholé a part of your life?

posted in: classical education 19

Scholé is not just something we do for or with our children. Scholé is for everyone, including homeschooling moms. Whether you call yourself a classical educator, a Charlotte Mason mom, an eclectic homeschooler, or something else entirely, you need to draw on the wells of learning yourself in order to model the life of loving to learn and grow. Scholé rises above our labels and recalls us to time-honored truths: A student, when he is fully trained, will be like … Read More

What is Scholé?

What does scholé even mean? Blame Josef Pieper and Christopher Perrin. Pieper’s seminal work, Leisure, the Basis of Culture opens with this: The classical ideal for education, which culminated in philosophy, was that its goal was truth-seeking, not profit-earning. To be pursuing education, philosophy, or theology was to be at leisure, because one was not concerned with productivity, profit, or politics. We think now of education being a different sort of work – intellectual work – but still work, partly … Read More

Morning Time As Lectio Divina

If classical education is the art of becoming free, then we need to build our habits of attention. The British-born turn-of-the-century American journalist, Sydney Harris, once posited: For this to be accomplished, we have to be selective and meditative about how and with what we furnish our minds – yes, our minds, and not only our children’s. Circle Time, or Morning Time (or Basket Time or Morning Meeting or whatever your family calls it), is our time for centering on … Read More

Homeschool Mama, You’re Not a Teacher

posted in: homeschooler, mother 25

Are you afraid of homeschooling because you know you’re not as smart or prepared as the teacher-down-the-road? We homeschooling moms can be an easy marketing target. Day schools promise so much more than we could ever hope to provide. They seem to run without a hitch and make us doubt that what we are doing at home can begin to compare. Sometimes they’re right. Sometimes classical day schools are a good choice. But sometimes it’s just marketing propaganda. What Is … Read More

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