Wisdom leading to virtue is the only liberal art – Seneca on learning

I am making slow, slow progress through The Great Tradition: Classical Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being is a collection of the writings about education from Plato to the modern era, the writings that have informed the development of western civilization and classical education. CH072: Teaching is Hard & Worth It: Seneca on Education Today is one final quote from Seneca, Roman statesman living in the time of Christ and Nero, whom the medievals and … Read More

Education works through habit – Aristotle on kindergarten

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So I began the section in The Great Tradition: Classical Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being of selections from Aristotle this week, which included portions of Nicomachean Ethics. And that’s amusing to me because I have two different translations of that title here on my desk still. I read different selections in preparation for the Scholé Sisters podcast episode “Making the Most of Summer with Habits and Virtue.” CH061: Classical Education Demands Habit Training The … Read More

What’s education good for? – Isocrates on public service

Sometimes it’s easy to sigh on a Tuesday morning and think, “What am I doing? What is the point anyway?” Today, Isocrates reminds us of the point – or, at least, one point. The Great Tradition: Classical Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being is a collection of the writings about education from Plato to the modern era, the writings that have informed the development of western civilization and classical education. CH059: Where Education Begins & … Read More

Portrait of a Graduate – Isocrates on the goal of learning

You know I like to ask what education is for and what it truly is. So, I’m loving The Great Tradition: Classical Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being because it’s basically a giant book entirely made up of essays written on that question throughout history. Today’s excerpt is a list of what a “graduate” should look like. What is the point of education? It is to prepare people for life. Even modern progressive education seeks … Read More

We need to know what we’re after. – Xenophon on education

If we start off on this homeschool journey with no idea what education is, why we’re doing it, or where we want to be at the end, we’ll flounder, frustrated and fickle. We’ll have no idea whether what we’re doing is working or if we’re doing a good job. We have to have a measuring stick to determine if we’re straightened out and moving forward. A measuring stick has a beginning and an end. Every Most Wednesdays here in 2016 … Read More

The reason for education

Last year my word of the year was virtue. Talk about an overwhelming word of the year! In that post, I wrote: Virtue is the goal of classical education, which is my “day job” as a homeschooling mother. The goal isn’t the math lesson, the goal is growing the person doing the math lesson. Virtue is not only knowing Christ, but acting like it. If we know Christ, we must act in accordance with Him. Virtue is becoming Christlike. Virtue … Read More

Why You Want to Give Up Homeschooling

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It’s February. Like clockwork homeschool moms hit burn out mode this time of year. Yes, it might be cloudy skies, lack of sleep, or holiday sugar-binges catching up with us, but if it’s a serious case – a break-the-pencils, I-quit sort of case – we will probably need to dig a little deeper. You know I’ve said you have to have a homeschool vision and you need solid principles, but these February days are where the rubber meets the roads and … Read More

Learning the Liberal Arts Tradition

Ok. When I asked what education book I should read next, the overwhelming response was The Liberal Arts Tradition, and you all did not steer me wrong. Between Consider This, The Liberal Arts Tradition, and The Living Page, I feel ready to tackle planning 7th grade for next year. You better believe my quotes for the next few weeks will be from this brief but packed little book. I am an English major and love the language arts emphasis of … Read More

Virtue is given to us | Wednesday with Words – Simply Convivial

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Because I selected virtue as my word of the year, I am curious to see where it pops up in my reading and determined to write them all down. The first instance to be so discovered and copied was in The Secret Providences of God by John Calvin, which I finished on Sunday. Our virtue is certain because it is provided, not ginned up. This is certain, that unless virtue is provided from heaven each new moment, because we are … Read More

Consider Why You’re Homeschooling

I’m reading my fresh-off-the-press copy of Karen Glass’ excellent Consider This – now with introduction by David Hicks. It’s brief, concise, easy-to-read, and cuts straight to the point. I love it. Classical education is about wisdom-loving, not knowledge-gathering As I’ve written before, the goal of education is virtue, and Karen’s first chapter jumps right into the heart of it. She proves that virtue – right acting – needs to be the end we are pursuing when we educate children (and … Read More

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