Taking pains to educate – Seneca on parenting

Let’s dig back into our reading of The Great Tradition: Classical Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being! This book is a collection of the writings about education from Plato to the modern era, the writings that have informed the development of western civilization and classical education. Most Wednesdays here in 2016 (and at the rate I’m going, through 2017!) I will be sharing a quote and a musing. I’d love to get some discussion going … Read More

Even STEM kids need English – Cicero on subject integration

Summer is for reading, right? Of course. The mornings can be a little looser, the routines ease up to make sure there’s plenty of margin not only for reading – but for marginalia and commonplacing as well. CH060: Education Requires Language So I continue pecking away, a page or two a day, in The Great Tradition: Classical Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being, a collection of the writings about education from Plato to the modern … Read More

Work, leisure, and amusement

posted in: classical education 0

Today as we continue to slowly, ever so slowly, read through the tome The Great Tradition, we come to the section from Aristotle where he presents the idea that initially drew me in to a more full concept of classical education and made me willing to read a book like Leisure: The Basis of Culture. Now, I didn’t hear this concept from Aristotle first; like most of us, I heard it first online. Cindy Rollins would say that she taught … Read More

Education works through habit – Aristotle on kindergarten

posted in: classical education 3

So I began the section in The Great Tradition: Classical Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being of selections from Aristotle this week, which included portions of Nicomachean Ethics. And that’s amusing to me because I have two different translations of that title here on my desk still. I read different selections in preparation for the Scholé Sisters podcast episode “Making the Most of Summer with Habits and Virtue.” CH061: Classical Education Demands Habit Training The … Read More

Latin is Brain Exercise – Isocrates on what is actually practical

The Great Tradition: Classical Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being is a collection of the writings about education from Plato to the modern era, the writings that have informed the development of western civilization and classical education. I’m spending rather a long time with Isocrates, but he has so many nuggets! Next week we’ll be on to Socrates, though, I promise. I couldn’t pass up today’s selection, though, because I thought it directly applied to … Read More

Learning requires the language arts – Isocrates on education

In this section from The Great Tradition: Classical Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being I felt validated in choosing English as my major and in my homeschooling approach. Classical education bills itself as strong in language – and it is – but lately it seems the voices want to clarify that CH060: Education Requires Language Wednesdays here in 2016 I will be sharing a quote and a musing. I’d love to get some discussion going … Read More

What’s education good for? – Isocrates on public service

Sometimes it’s easy to sigh on a Tuesday morning and think, “What am I doing? What is the point anyway?” Today, Isocrates reminds us of the point – or, at least, one point. The Great Tradition: Classical Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being is a collection of the writings about education from Plato to the modern era, the writings that have informed the development of western civilization and classical education. CH059: Where Education Begins & … Read More

Portrait of a Graduate – Isocrates on the goal of learning

You know I like to ask what education is for and what it truly is. So, I’m loving The Great Tradition: Classical Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being because it’s basically a giant book entirely made up of essays written on that question throughout history. Today’s excerpt is a list of what a “graduate” should look like. What is the point of education? It is to prepare people for life. Even modern progressive education seeks … Read More

We need to know what we’re after. – Xenophon on education

If we start off on this homeschool journey with no idea what education is, why we’re doing it, or where we want to be at the end, we’ll flounder, frustrated and fickle. We’ll have no idea whether what we’re doing is working or if we’re doing a good job. We have to have a measuring stick to determine if we’re straightened out and moving forward. A measuring stick has a beginning and an end. Every Most Wednesdays here in 2016 … Read More

Practicing early home education – Plato on preschool

So often it is the mothers of three-year-olds, maybe five-year-olds, who are most concerned with educational principles and theories and practices. I know I was. My commonplace quote from today justifies this preoccupation. The Great Tradition: Classical Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being is a collection of the writings about education from Plato to the modern era, the writings that have informed the development of western civilization and classical education. Teaching does not begin with … Read More

1 2 3 4 5 6