What makes a good teacher? – Plato on learning & teaching

I’m reading The Great Tradition this year, and posting about it as I go. I’ve had a few people ask about a schedule, but I’m not committing to anything but slow progress. I’m taking a page from Brandy on slow reading and sitting down most days to read two or three pages at a time. Today’s commonplace quote is from page 4. I told you I am reading it slowly! This selection is from Plato, the first philosopher on education … Read More

A teacher must pay attention.

What is education? I love to collect quotes on what education means. Definitions are important, because without them we can be using the same word but with entirely different understandings of what we’re talking about. Without understanding what it is we’re trying to do each and every day with our children, we flounder and fall back on our defaults – what’s easiest rather than what’s best. Knowing definitions is utterly practical. CH057: A Teacher’s Attention So today’s quote, still from … Read More

The reason for education

Last year my word of the year was virtue. Talk about an overwhelming word of the year! In that post, I wrote: Virtue is the goal of classical education, which is my “day job” as a homeschooling mother. The goal isn’t the math lesson, the goal is growing the person doing the math lesson. Virtue is not only knowing Christ, but acting like it. If we know Christ, we must act in accordance with Him. Virtue is becoming Christlike. Virtue … Read More

Being Happy: Having an organized attitude

posted in: mindset, mother 12

An organized attitude, scholé, and ordo amoris are all tightly connected, at least in my mind. The threads are coming together in the book Reordered Love, Reordered Lives: Learning the Deep Meaning of Happiness which I purchased and began chiefly on the strength of the title. Of course I checked out the author and a few reviews, but the title had me. I’ve not been disappointed. Virtue is Happiness Virtue is my word of the year for 2015, and it … Read More

An education based on harmony

If you’re reading Afterthoughts (and I’m assuming you are, of course), then you might start getting the feeling that you really should read The Liberal Arts Tradition, and you’d be right. Where Karen Glass’ Consider This nudged Charlotte Mason devotees toward the classical tradition, The Liberal Arts Tradition nudges classical educators toward the Charlotte Mason – because these are actually channels within the same stream, not different streams. Charlotte Mason took the classical education principles she learned — by her … Read More

Seeking Leisure & Scholé

I am currently in the midst of the summer teacher class “Bringing Scholé to the Home & Homeschool,” taught by Dr. Christopher Perrin. He’s been assigning chapters from The Liberal Arts Tradition and Leisure, the Basis of Culture, and though I’ve read both books before, it’s been excellent to revisit Leisure (it’s been years since I last read it) with the opportunity to discuss it with others and to see how The Liberal Arts Tradition is putting legs on the … Read More

Daily faithfulness over measurable results

posted in: homemaker, mindset, mother 5

One more post about Michael Horton’s Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World if you’ll humor me. I think this is a book any mom deep in the trenches of raising kids would appreciate. Horton grounds us in solid teaching that centers us on the Gospel, in the finished work of Christ, rather than on ambitious, restless desires for “doing great things for God.” This doesn’t mean we do nothing. Rest is not inactivity. Is is a state of … Read More

True community, true maturity :: A Convivial Commonplace

posted in: extra 5

I’m reading Michael Horton’s Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World, which is not-so-subtly a response to Radical by David Platt, though Horton’s book doesn’t mention it by name. I’ve never read anything by Horton before, and I am enjoying it. He is a good writer, one who can keep drawing you in and engaging you even while keeping his style targeted to a young modern audience (it takes skill to define the word redundant in the flow of … Read More

You are in charge of your choices.

I recently finished Sally Clarkson’s new book, Own Your Life. The Clarksons are authors of one of my favorite homeschooling books, especially for starting out with young kids: Educating the Whole-Hearted Child. Owning your life is hard work and there are no easy answers. Sally Clarkson writes about how to be in charge of your life – not in a way that is controlling and self-seeking or self-aggrandizing, but in a way that sees that choices have consequences. We are … Read More

Virtue is given to us | Wednesday with Words – Simply Convivial

posted in: classical education 4

Because I selected virtue as my word of the year, I am curious to see where it pops up in my reading and determined to write them all down. The first instance to be so discovered and copied was in The Secret Providences of God by John Calvin, which I finished on Sunday. Our virtue is certain because it is provided, not ginned up. This is certain, that unless virtue is provided from heaven each new moment, because we are … Read More

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