How to make homeschool lesson plans in Evernote

evernote for homeschooling

So, you have Evernote set up, you are using it to gather inspiration and ideas for your homeschool, you know how to get your stuff into Evernote, and you have the beginnings of your homeschool year overview saved in Evernote.

Now let’s start getting into real, nitty-gritty homeschool planning with Evernote: Evernote homeschool lesson plans.

There are many ways to do lesson plans, even within Evernote. I’ll give you three ideas here.

No matter how you make your homeschool lesson plans, they can be kept safely in Evernote.

1. Homeschool lesson plans in Evernote as lists

This year I included a “word a week” in our twice-weekly “Elementary Lessons” co-op with kids 8-11. I made the entire plan for the year during the summer within Evernote. Here’s what it looks like:

ww-homeschool-evernote

We do six six-week terms, but I knew I’d want to use the last week for review. So I picked 5 words per term and simply put them into lists of 5, linking to the wordoftheday page where I found them.

So, all I had to do when it was time for our word of the day slot was open up the note with a quick search, then click on the next word’s link. Up popped the definition for me to read and copy onto the board, and with that we were off to the races.

This list-as-lesson plan would also work with read-alouds (make a list of books and just move down the list as you read them), too. I’m planning on utilizing it a lot more extensively this coming year because it worked out so well this year.

When next year is planned, I promise to show you my Evernote homeschool plans.

2. Homeschool lesson plans in Evernote as saved tables

If you’ve made lesson plans in some other format, of course you can also simply move those into Evernote, where they will be faster to pull up and more likely to be saved long-term.

el-plans-homeschool-evernote

I have saved tables I made in the word processor into Evernote as a pdf. Saving it and using it from Evernote worked well enough, but for some reason I thought scheduling things out in detail for each class would work this year. But it didn’t, of course. We’d be on schedule in one subject, behind on another, and maybe even ahead in a third. And that meant I simply ignored it and went back to my simpler plan: Pick up the book, open to the bookmark, read.

Now, sometimes my lesson plans are a little more detailed of a list, but still basically a list. Here are my writing class plans, for example:

wc-homeschool-evernote

Not much detail, but I took what I wanted to cover and spread it out over the year to make sure we would be able to get to it all and still have enough time to practice the skills before moving on.

3. Homeschool lesson plans in Evernote as detailed notes

If you tend to write more detailed lesson plans for some subjects, you can do this directly in Evernote, too. The formatting options can add more organization than a straight plain text editor, and those lesson plans are then available for subsequent children without having to hunt for them years later!

If you want your lesson plans to be easily reusable, then label the lessons by number rather than by date. This will help if your school year gets out of sync due to sick days or other opportunities that cause rescheduling.

So, something like this:

homeschool-lesson-plan

Begin by creating your lesson plan format, then cut and paste that as many times as you need to into the note. Then you can go back and start filling it in, and already have a head start with the outline you’ve set out for yourself.

Writing homeschool lesson plans can be as varied as the people making them, and some subjects lend themselves to different types of planning than others.

No matter how you make your lesson plans, however, they can be kept safely in Evernote.

One Response

  1. […] homeschool? Mystie at Simply Convivial has an entire series on Evernote. This latest post is about How to Make Homeschool Lesson Plans in Evernote. It’s fascinating to read, especially if you love planning like I […]