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Homeschooling High School: Align Your Expectations

So we’ve successfully finished our first year of homeschooling high school. In many ways it was not different; we just took the next step. We didn’t drastically change anything about the workload or the process or the system. His level of work did increase, but it was simply another incremental increase in work of the same kind, not a completely different experience. I had planned to share 3 tips for homeschooling high school, but before I do that I thought … Read More

Twelve-year-olds are persons, too.

Charlotte Mason’s First Principle, applied I am in a local book club, studying Charlotte Mason’s 20 Principles using the study guide by Brandy Vencel. I’ve done this study in an online group before, but there’s something different and more personal in a local group that includes people who know your kids and family. Last month’s meeting was on Principle 1: Children are born persons, and one of the extra readings linked to in the study guide is a post I … Read More

How to Focus on Truth in a Homeschool Day

It’s easy for a homeschool day to go off the rails. As must as we would like to blame the toddler or the teen, usually that derailing starts in our own heads, in our own hearts, as the homeschool mom. Our mood, our demeanor, our responses, make or break the atmosphere of our homeschool. And so our thoughts and our emotions matter. Do we control them or do they control us? When our moods and minds are being swayed by … Read More

Growth Mindset for Moms

Moms are all about growth. It starts with growing a new little life right inside of our own selves. The growth is in our bellies, and then it’s in our arms. We go through boxes of clothes, changing them out seemingly overnight because growth is so rapid. Our family size grows, gradually, over the years, and we learn to adjust to more needs, more love, more food, more laundry. Life overflows abundantly and we get the front-row seat to the … Read More

Ordo amoris in real life: making kids care

The math page looms. “But I don’t want to,” the child moans. The book awaits. “But I don’t like it,” the child whines. Maybe you start off homeschooling with grand visions and high hopes. Maybe you change your approach and your style and think that will fix the bad days and the bad attitudes. It turns out that even in spite of best laid plans, principles, and practices, we’re teaching real children. They don’t always like what they should. They … Read More

3 Ways Kids’ Personalities Affect Learning

posted in: homeschooler | 2

By now you know I like to geek out about personality. I’ve written about the personalities of homeschool moms. I’ve theorized about kids’ personalities and learning styles. And I’ve applied all my researching and musing to specific examples like how our personalities should affect our personal refreshment, our planning styles, and our morning routines. Over the last few months, then, you can be sure I’ve fielded numerous emails on this topic. And while I love troubleshooting personality questions and applications, … Read More

Parents’ expectations matter. – Quintilian on ability

Quintilian might be my favorite author in this book so far. The Great Tradition: Classical Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being is a collection of the writings about education from Plato to the modern era, the writings that have informed the development of western civilization and classical education. CH069: Imagination & Expectation: Quintilian on Education As I read oh so slowly through this book, I’d love to get some discussion going about what it means … Read More

Wisdom leading to virtue is the only liberal art – Seneca on learning

I am making slow, slow progress through The Great Tradition: Classical Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being is a collection of the writings about education from Plato to the modern era, the writings that have informed the development of western civilization and classical education. CH072: Teaching is Hard & Worth It: Seneca on Education Today is one final quote from Seneca, Roman statesman living in the time of Christ and Nero, whom the medievals and … Read More

An education based on harmony

If you’re reading Afterthoughts (and I’m assuming you are, of course), then you might start getting the feeling that you really should read The Liberal Arts Tradition, and you’d be right. Where Karen Glass’ Consider This nudged Charlotte Mason devotees toward the classical tradition, The Liberal Arts Tradition nudges classical educators toward the Charlotte Mason – because these are actually channels within the same stream, not different streams. Charlotte Mason took the classical education principles she learned — by her … Read More

What is the point of learning Latin?

posted in: homeschooler | 38

In “How We Homeschool Latin“, I said that there are generally three reasons given for the study of Latin: It helps with vocabulary and thus with high test scores. It helps with logical thinking, because it’s grammar study that actually makes sense. It is the language of Virgil and much of the literature of Christendom, which we should be trying to read in the original. I’ve been reading in classical education circles for over ten years now, and while there … Read More

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