Macbeth Lesson Plans

Yes, Macbeth is dark and gruesome and not the easiest Shakespeare story to relate to. The Scottish thane Macbeth listens to witches who clearly should not be trusted and nothing good comes of it – listening to them, in fact, poisons his mind and damns him on earth to a life without sleep and without remorse. Blood will have blood, and by the time the end of the play rolls around, everyone cheers for Macduff’s final blow that strikes the … Read More

Memory or Understanding? – Cassiodorus on Learning

Next up in the early church readings on education in The Great Tradition: Cassiodorus. Cassiodorus was a consul in Rome, living through the drawn-out fall of Rome, and ending up as an advisor to Theodoric along with Boethius. He was of noble birth and a devout Christian. Late in his life he founded a monastery with the express purpose of preserving ancient culture as he watched Rome’s disintegration. His monastery didn’t last beyond his own lifetime, but his works excerpted … Read More

Merchant of Venice Lesson Plans

Merchant of Venice might be a politically incorrect play, but it is too good for us to ignore. While it makes moderns uncomfortable because the Jew is made to forcibly convert in the end, it is – particularly for its time – an anti-anti-Semitic play. The plot, the speeches, and the themes all deserve attention and affection – and this simple set of homeschool lesson plans will help you build just that. Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice for Kids Merchant of … Read More

Lesson Plans for The Comedy of Errors

The Comedy of Errors is a great play for kids who might be skeptical about Shakespeare. Full of slap-stick humor, over-the-top coincidences, and witty one-liners, Comedy of Errors is more about the laughs than the romance. Plus, it has one added benefit: it’s a very short play. If you’ve tried Shakespeare with your kids in the past but have found your crowd to be particularly tough or your own enthusiasm to be low, try Comedy of Errors – the numerous … Read More

Lesson Plans for Much Ado About Nothing

Shakespeare doesn’t have to be scary or intense to incorporate into your homeschool. The stories are timeless, the language is beautiful, and they are chock full of ridiculous characters and jokes that are sure to make everyone laugh. Yet, they also demonstrate an understanding of the human condition and human relationships that make them a keystone in the English literary tradition. We do Shakespeare in about 10-15 minutes a chunk, twice a week, and in this way we read and … Read More

Morning Time Mottos for Moms & Kids

We recite mottos during our Morning Time. I think the first place I encountered the idea was when listening to ACCS teacher training audio (back before there were CiRCE conferences or podcasts). The elementary classes of Logos School, at least back in the old days, had mottos they recited daily that then the teacher could call to mind when they were relevant. As a family, we already had a few little sayings – ways to keep a frequent command familiar, … Read More

Lesson Plans for Shakespeare’s The Tempest

The Tempest is a story with betrayal, revenge, reconciliation, and devotion. It has something for everyone: slap-stick humor, violent men & monsters, friendly sprites, and a fairy-tale island setting where forgiveness and keeping one’s word wins out in the end despite long odds. Whether you introduce this story by picture book, movie, or reading the real deal – or all three – it is a story worth enjoying together with your children. Shakespeare’s The Tempest for Kids 1. Introduce The … Read More

Memory Work for Summer Term 2016

posted in: homeschooler | 4

A new year, a new term means new memory work content. Each term we change out our new material to repeat daily for six weeks, whether we have it all word-for-word at 4 weeks or not yet by the end of six weeks. To me, it’s less about word-perfect memorization (which is, let’s face it, fleeting) and more about daily exposure and repetition. Exposure breeds taste. So daily we return to hymns, to Scripture, to poetry, to poetry in Scripture, … Read More

Morning Time Plans | 2016-2017 School Year Planning

Time for planning another school year! And we all know planning is the best part. Eventually we have to get down to business and work the plan, but this is the time of year we get to dream and imagine a school day where no one argues, where everyone starts their letters from the top, and where naps are regular. Ha. OK, so, then we have to come back to reality and recognize that our plans are only going to … Read More

Lesson Plans for Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar

We’re in the midst of studying Julius Caesar this year. The boys are happy to be doing a play that has nothing to do with marriage or love, but rather with stern and noble Romans. Shakespeare doesn’t need to be intimidating or complicated. It’s really just about enjoying a good story together, as with any other read-aloud! Here are the resources we’ve been using while enjoying Julius Caesar together. Step 1: Introduce Julius Caesar I always begin a new play … Read More

1 2