Classical Education is Idealistic (Norms & Nobility Notes, prologue)

Slow read with me through Norms and Nobility. Or, if you don’t have or can’t get a copy of your own, consider this your Cliff’s Notes version. ? Previous post: Preface Next post: chapter 1, section 1 The prologue primarily addresses the dichotomy between the modern view of man and his role and the traditional, classical view. Or, as James K.A. Smith has written, “Every pedagogy assumes an anthropology.” What you believe about man shapes how you educate. Classical education … Read More

Intrinsic v. Extrinsic Rewards for Moms at Home

posted in: homemaker, productivity | 1

We’ve all felt it. We sip our coffee and stare down at our list. We just don’t wanna. Maybe we just can’t even. Or, perhaps with the coffee we think we can take on that list, but come 10am or noon or 2pm, all the motivation is gone – poof – seemingly for good. What do we do? Give up? Trudge, grudgingly, on? Fuss and whine, whether internally or, worse, externally in the tone we mete out to the kids? … Read More

Ordo amoris in real life: making kids care

The math page looms. “But I don’t want to,” the child moans. The book awaits. “But I don’t like it,” the child whines. Maybe you start off homeschooling with grand visions and high hopes. Maybe you change your approach and your style and think that will fix the bad days and the bad attitudes. It turns out that even in spite of best laid plans, principles, and practices, we’re teaching real children. They don’t always like what they should. They … Read More

Reordering Loves, Organizing Attitudes, Being Happy

posted in: mindset, mother | 12

An organized attitude, scholé, and ordo amoris are all tightly connected, at least in my mind. The threads are coming together in the book Reordered Love, Reordered Lives: Learning the Deep Meaning of Happiness which I purchased and began chiefly on the strength of the title. Of course I checked out the author and a few reviews, but the title had me. I’ve not been disappointed. Virtue is Happiness Virtue is my word of the year for 2015, and it … Read More

An education based on harmony

If you’re reading Afterthoughts (and I’m assuming you are, of course), then you might start getting the feeling that you really should read The Liberal Arts Tradition, and you’d be right. Where Karen Glass’ Consider This nudged Charlotte Mason devotees toward the classical tradition, The Liberal Arts Tradition nudges classical educators toward the Charlotte Mason – because these are actually channels within the same stream, not different streams. Charlotte Mason took the classical education principles she learned — by her … Read More

What is Intrinsic Motivation? Motivating Without Stickers

posted in: homemaker, mindset, productivity | 3

So, if Daniel Pink, in his book Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, is correct in his conclusions, extrinsic motivators should be taboo whenever the work we assign requires creativity or when it is something that touches personhood (virtue, learning). So what tactics are left to us? If we aren’t to use sticker charts or play money or marbles or other superficial reward structures, are there any tactics we can use? Intrinsic Motivators in the Home & Homeschool … Read More

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