Whole wheat cinnamon rolls – a recipe for Sunday breakfasts

posted in: extra | 3

Off and on now for a couple years, I’ve made cinnamon rolls on Saturday to have for Sunday breakfast. I wanted a way to have a special, set-apart breakfast, but one that didn’t leave the kitchen in shambles Sunday morning or add more things to do before we get everyone spiffed up for church.

This whole wheat cinnamon roll recipe will give your family a delicious favorite that's been made a little bit healthier.
I’ve tried a lot of recipes over the years, and my favorite is actually The Pioneer Woman’s cinnamon rolls. But, in my mind, those are Holiday cinnamon rolls, not a weekly affair. I want a special breakfast, but not one that is going to give the kids a sugar rush and then crash while we’re at church.

So, I do make special cinnamon rolls for extra special occasions, but for the weekly Lord’s Day breakfast, I stick with whole wheat, lightly sugared affairs that are delicious but substantive.

I began with Rachel’s Cinnamon Triumph Rolls, but have adapted it enough now that it feels legitimate enough to post my own version. Plus, I just recently created a cinnamon roll frosting-glaze that I’m actually happy with, so I’ll share that also!

This whole wheat cinnamon roll recipe will give your family a delicious favorite that's been made a little bit healthier.
## Whole Wheat Cinnamon Roll Recipe

In a mixer, dump in

  • 3 cups warm milk
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • 1 1⁄2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 Tablespoon yeast
  • 2 eggs
  • 2/3 cup oil
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 5 cups whole wheat flour

Knead in the mixer for 3 minutes or until thoroughly combined.

Add 2-3 cups white flour until the dough holds together, but is still smooth and moist. Knead for another 3 minutes.

Put the dough into a large mixing bowl, cover with a tea towel, and let rise until double (about an hour).

Divide the dough in half. Grease a baking sheet and a 9×13 pan with butter.

Roll out one portion of the dough into a thin rectangle. Crack an egg into the middle and use your fingers to spread the egg over the surface of the dough. After washing your hands, sprinkle 1/2 cup sugar over the dough and then sprinkle liberally with cinnamon.

Roll up from the longest end and then slice two-inch rolls off the log. A dough slicer or pizza cutter makes quick work of it. Place each roll in the greased pans.

Let rise for 20-30 minutes in the pan while the oven preheats to 400. Bake for 15-20 minutes at 400.

Best Cinnamon Roll Frosting Recipe

In a mixing bowl, beat 1/4 cup whipping cream until it forms soft peaks.

Add 1 cup powdered sugar, a tad vanilla, and 1 tablespoon very soft butter. Beat until it’s combined.

Spread atop the cinnamon rolls when they are cool.

This whole wheat cinnamon roll recipe will give your family a delicious favorite that's been made a little bit healthier.

Learn how simple bread-making can be!

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3 Responses

  1. Sarah
    | Reply

    These sound delicious! I can’t wait to try your recipe. I was wondering if you can share what you do to make them up ahead on Saturday? Do you go ahead and completely cook them and then just re-warm on Sunday when you’re ready to eat? I’m not a very experienced bread maker, so I didn’t know if it’s possible to make the dough, make into rolls, and then pop in the fridge until morning? Thanks!

    • Mystie Winckler
      | Reply

      I usually bake them on Saturday. The kids just eat theirs without being warmed, but my husband warms his serving in the microwave for 30 seconds. You can also let them rise in the pan, covered in the fridge overnight, and bake them in the morning, but it takes longer to go from cold to baked. I generally cook mine the day before because the kids always want to eat right away in the morning and don’t like waiting, and I don’t get up extra early on Sundays. :)

      • Sarah
        | Reply

        Thanks!

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